Back To School! Adding A Custom Bindable Property To Xamarin Forms

Back To School! Adding A Custom Bindable Property To Xamarin Forms

The exact API discussed below has been deprecated by Xamarin! Not to worry though – all of the concepts discussed are still valid. The only difference is that you should use the API that does not include generics when doing a BindableProperty.Create(). Other than that, everything discussed within this post is 100% valid. See Part 2 of this post here for an explanation as to why Xamarin deprecated the API, and what to do about it. So how did you spend your summer vacation? One thing is for sure, I did not spend my month of August blogging! I presented two sessions at That Conference in mid-August and then in late August gave another session at Xamarin Dev Days – Madison. Not exactly resting on the shores of beautiful Lake Mendota here in Madison … but a lot of fun nonetheless. Anyway – I’m back with a Back To School Blog! This time we’re going to take a look at how to create a custom binding to a ContentView within Xamarin Forms. What’s A Custom Bindable Property? Have you ever found yourself wanting to create a control or a view that inherited from ContentView and you needed to implement data binding on a property that that control/view exposed – so you could tie the property to a view model? The good news is we can do this … We can fully customize the way it binds to the view model – one way, two way, one way to source. The even better news – it’s pretty easy once you see it the first time! So let’s take a look...
Xamarin Dev Days – Madison Recap!

Xamarin Dev Days – Madison Recap!

It’s Your Day That was the mantra that James Montemagno repeated time and time again during his opening remarks yesterday, August 22, for Xamarin Dev Days – Madison. And truly, it was the developers’ day, as there were tons of insightful questions, comments and positive reactions throughout the day as people learned and explored the Xamarin platform. We have an amazing community of .Net developers here in Wisconsin who came together to make Xamarin Dev Days – Madison a success! We had people drive in from Milwaukee… Stevens Point… Wausau… in other words, we had people driving upwards of 3 hours to attend this event! That really speaks to both the passion of the .Net community here in Wisconsin and the product that Xamarin has developed. All in all – about 65 people made it to the event … and they just didn’t come for the delicious bagels provided by Code Mill Technologies! I want to extend a thank you to James Montemagno, Krystin Stutesman, and James White – all from Xamarin. They performed like a well oiled machine! Professional, in-sync, and constantly on their game! Nothing phased them. James Montemagno gave an outstanding introduction to cross platform development with Xamarin – including Test Cloud. Great turnout at #Xamarindevdays Wisconsin. @JamesMontemagno preaching the good word. pic.twitter.com/9W3z7k4RxT — James White (@maestersid) August 22, 2015 Then Krystin Stutesman took over to give the crowd an intro to Xamarin Forms. Mitch Muenster – a local developer – followed by speaking on enabling network connectivity for your apps with Xamarin. Then it was my turn – I talked about cheese – and Azure...
Code Mill Minute: Adding npm Modules to Azure Mobile Services

Code Mill Minute: Adding npm Modules to Azure Mobile Services

I recently had to add some npm modules to a “classic” Azure Mobile Service instance built on node.js. (I say classic, which is accessed through the old portal, as opposed to the new Azure Mobile Apps, which is managed through the new portal. But the process to add npm modules will be more or less the same.) As I was doing so, I thought to myself … “this would be a great idea for a Code Mill Minute”! Mainly because the first time I had to add npm modules to an Azure Mobile Service I was stumped for a bit. (For a while, I really liked editing my JavaScript through the built in editor in Azure.) But it turns out it’s really an easy process. So here we go with a step by step process: Log into, or create, an AMS instance. Once there, head on over to the “Configure” tab. There you will see a “Git Url” text box. Copy the contents of that guy. Head on over to your favorite git manager and clone that repo. (I prefer using Visual Studio with Node Tools for Visual Studio installed. In fact, I’m giving a talk on introducing Node.js to .Net developers at That Conference, Monday August 10. You should go! End of shameless plug.) Once you have the repo cloned, you are now free to issue npm install commands, and have it grab your modules, update the node_module folder & package.json file. Start developing using the new goodness downloaded from npm! Commit and push your repo back to Azure Please note … you do not … and I...